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Ron Gilbert's Thimbleweed blog

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Has anyone here been following it? It think it's pretty interesting view on how he designs adventure games. Even if the game would end sucking hard, at least the process of how he will get there will be very interesting to see, if he keeps up the pace he's been posting stuff of the progress of things.

http://blog.thimbleweedpark.com/

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It's a fantastic blog, probably the most inside look I've seen with adventure games -- I've just caught up with it

by reading it all over the course of the last few days...

 

What I like as well is that they really narrowed it down to a time frame and scope of game that they knew

they could likely deliver and in an art style, etc. that is achievable within that time frame and budget.

 

I obviously love SpaceVenture as well and I don't mind the delays with it and I think it will also be a more forward-looking

and revolutionary game than Thimbleweed Park, but it is refreshing to see that Ron and Gary took a measured approach

in contrast to pretty much all the other adventure game kickstarters. It also feels like they're going back to the fundamentals

of great adventure games and building everything up from there.

 

I'm hoping that with the Thimbleweed Park engine built and with their new company established that we will get 

more adventure games from them in the future, hopefully some in the same art style as Monkey Island...

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Well, looks like my wish was granted, they just hired Mark Ferrari who did the backgrounds for Monkey Island

and Loom and already the example they showed looks way better than the Maniac Mansion style they had

previously been using...

 

circus_1b.png

 

 

And that is a rough, not-finished background as well...

Apparently he's going to be doing most of the backgrounds and so the art style of the game will now be somewhere in between 

Maniac Mansion and Monkey Island...

I'm glad they decided to go in this direction, as I think most people were secretly wishing the art was like this instead of

Maniac Mansion style...

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Ahhhhhh wish I was able to have backed.

 

Can still back it -- 

http://blog.thimbleweedpark.com/backer

 

Also the blog is open to everyone, you don't have to be a backer to read it...

 

I wonder what would have happened if they had used this art style when they were running the Kickstarter,

I reckon it would have got them even more funds.

I think while people were excited for a new Ron Gilbert and Gary Winnick game, the basic Maniac Mansion art style was

just a step too far back for some people, perhaps.

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Yeah, I don't have money, though. :(

The new shot looks great! Judging by the interview, Mark is not aware of a little 8-bit art editor called Grafx2, which is a spiritual successor to Deluxe Paint and even replicates the design and interface, but is compatible with modern platforms and image formats. Even has layer support.

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It's not difficult at all to use in DOSBox. Basically plug and play. Touch and go. Drag and drop. Literally. Just drag the DP.EXE file onto the DOSBox shortcut and it'll do the rest.

 

Grafx2 is great, but I've already come across some limitations. It can't do much with gradients beyond rectangles and ellipses, which is very disappointing. There needs to be a flood-fill gradient tool option like Deluxe Paint had where you could pick the direction and style of the gradient, although there are ways around it with stencils and layers. But DP had a neat feature that would shape a gradient flodfill to whatever shape you were filling in in different ways, so it's still quite useful. Using them both in conjunction with eachother yields some great results, though. I've been using both with the newly released SCI Companion 3 which can edit SCI1.1 VGA games. Making a screen that palette cycles is fuuuuun.

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It's not difficult at all to use in DOSBox. Basically plug and play. Touch and go. Drag and drop. Literally. Just drag the DP.EXE file onto the DOSBox shortcut and it'll do the rest.

You have to be careful using applications other than games in DOSBox.  The authors of DOSBox recommend that people not use productivity applications in DOSBox, as there is a strong possibility that files can become corrupted.  I've personally had this happen to me before when working on a game project in Klik n Play through DOSBox.  There are still ways to run DOS productivity applications safely on modern systems (without the risk of losing your work through file corruption) though, such as a Windows 9x virtual machine or booting up your computer in FreeDOS.

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That looks PRETTY. The full scrolling screen reminds me of the beginning of Loom, which I'm sure is no accident. Also a bit of Monkey Island in there. I love 8-bit artwork. The parallaxing is also neat! It's so great to see what modern tech can do with retro 8-bit art.

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