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shoptroll

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  1. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from ChrisPope in Additional Storefronts   
    Another vote for Humble and itch.io.  Both seem to have pretty low bars for entry so it shouldn't be all that hard to get the game on them.  Humble also has the added benefit of having an embeddable widget you can include on the game's web page.
     
    Green Man Gaming also sells games but I'm not sure if they're just a vendor for Steam keys.  Might be worth investigating anyways.
  2. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from marsilies in Additional Storefronts   
    Another vote for Humble and itch.io.  Both seem to have pretty low bars for entry so it shouldn't be all that hard to get the game on them.  Humble also has the added benefit of having an embeddable widget you can include on the game's web page.
     
    Green Man Gaming also sells games but I'm not sure if they're just a vendor for Steam keys.  Might be worth investigating anyways.
  3. Like
    shoptroll reacted to drdrslashvohaul in Political correctness and feminism   
    There's also the issue that if 1,000,000 video games have been made, and 1% have strong female leads, one should be able to find 10,000 examples. Doesn't mean there isn't a gross imbalance.
  4. Like
    shoptroll reacted to Troels Pleimert in Political correctness and feminism   
    Obscure? Okay, now it's personal.
  5. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Collector in Political correctness and feminism   
    Apologies in advance if my post comes off like I'm firing from both barrels without warning.  Because this has been irking me all day and I wanted to chime in.
    Yup.  The article Fronzel linked points that out later on: "The sexual violence at the end of that tutorial will single out a fifth of the female audience who have experienced sexual violence".  There's also this October 2013 report from the World Health Organization which shows that number jumps up to 35% on a worldwide scale for general sexual violence.
     
    Look Fronzel, this isn't some sort of moral panic like the ones you're equating it to.  No one is saying people need to stop making these games because bad things will happen if they don't.  People want the industry to shift away from a very entrenched worldview.  This isn't a hobby that is the domain of only adolescent white males these days.  There are other people playing games, and they are all minorities who are very underrepresented by the medium.  You say "It's 100% pure escapism".  How is it escapism for women if the majority of the time they're forced to play as a male character?  How is it escapism for a person of color when the vast majority of game characters are white?  Or LGBTQ players who want to have a non-heterosexual relationship option in a game but the developers didn't think to include one?
     
    This isn't the gestapo coming by and saying we need to burn these games.  This is criticism.  This is a reviewer doing her job and saying that she had a very negative reaction to a specific scene in a game that she didn't think was handled properly by the developers.  This is a reviewer who clearly enjoyed the previous game and is pointing out to the developer and the community that she thinks a specific scene weakens the product and will likely negatively impact other players too.  Criticism allows people to have a dialogue about issues.  Censorship does not.  Shouting down people who bring up valid points is not how you have a dialogue such as this follow-up interview with Dennaton on RPS.  What Cara's doing is no different than someone pointing out they didn't think the voice acting was good on a specific character, or something in the story doesn't make sense.  She's not doing it because she hates the game, she's doing it because she wants this to be a good experience for anyone who plays it.  People don't get better at making things unless people are willing to explain the faults in their work.  And considering rape isn't usually handled well in a lot of fiction, it's a good criticism to levy because it can encourage the authors to revisit their work and see if they can handle it better or use a different scene to convey the same information (see the above interview).
     
    She's also doing other people a favor by highlighting content that might be problematic for them.  With 1 out of every 5 women having suffered from rape (and the real statistic is probably higher because it's an underreported crime for various reasons) there's real reason to let victims who might not be aware of the content in the game (especially considering the previous game didn't have any sexual violence in it).  Rape victims often suffer from something akin to PTSD like soldiers (and this is true of other abuse victims as well) and stuff like this can cause a very physical response for them.  That's being an empathic human being and looking out for others.
     
    No one is saying you can't enjoy these things.  I enjoyed the Larry games because I found them funny, but I also acknowledge there's some problematic bits in them as well (and a lot of this is due to the age in which the games were made).  I also like Game of Thrones which is also problematic in spots.  Does people pointing out the problematic bits diminsh my enjoyment of them?  Not really, but I also don't think people shouldn't voice their opinions and criticisms when there's something problematic going on.
     
    As for why it seems like this is all you see about games these days... Well it's a combination of factors.  The main one is that there's a lot more gamers out there from all walks of life and it's no longer the 80's or 90's where many of the minorities were unwilling to speak up.  The Internet has given a lot of groups their own safe spaces to gather and discuss issues without fear of retaliation.  Some of these people are now writing for game publications, running their own sites, or just being vocal on social media.  So a lot of opinions that were being kept underground before are now out in the open and finding there's an audience of likeminded people.  There's also the fact that a lot of people are dissastisfied with the current stagnation in the market and encouraging developers to write for different demographics is one way of addressing this.  And some people are growing older and looking around and noticing that "hey, there's very few games with good female characters for my daughter to look up to".  (Great post here by Jeff Vogel of Spiderweb Software if anyone's interested)
     
    I'm 31 and have been gaming since I was 5.  I know I'd much rather live in a world where more people feel empowered by games because they can find characters to relate to other than buff macho white guy with a gun.  I love games and I want more people to enjoy them.  I also want to live in a world where hopefully my offspring will be able to enjoy a large variety of games regardless of their gender (or sexual orientation, or religious beliefs, or ethnicity, etc.).
     
    So I ask you, Fronzel, what the fuck gives you the right to air question another person's opinion in such a callous manner?
  6. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Frede in Political correctness and feminism   
    What I'm saying is that not all games need to cater strictly to the adolescent white male demographic.  If I my hypothetical daughter and she comes to me asking for games that have a female protagonist because she wants to play as a woman, I could probably count on my fingers the number of modern mainstream games which I could give her.  I would not have this problem if my hypothetical son asked for a game with a male protagonist.  I'd have an even harder time if either of them were LGBTQ and wanted a protagonist to relate to.
     
    It's fine if we still have games that cater to adolescent white males.  But variety is the spice of life, and that is what part of the community is asking for.
     
     
    (emphasis added in previous quote) And there's one of the reasons people are asking for change.  Some of us don't want ham-fisted stories or commentary.  If you have commentary to make, do it right.  Don't fall back on lazy tropes or stereotypes for plots and characters.
  7. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from drdrslashvohaul in Political correctness and feminism   
    What I'm saying is that not all games need to cater strictly to the adolescent white male demographic.  If I my hypothetical daughter and she comes to me asking for games that have a female protagonist because she wants to play as a woman, I could probably count on my fingers the number of modern mainstream games which I could give her.  I would not have this problem if my hypothetical son asked for a game with a male protagonist.  I'd have an even harder time if either of them were LGBTQ and wanted a protagonist to relate to.
     
    It's fine if we still have games that cater to adolescent white males.  But variety is the spice of life, and that is what part of the community is asking for.
     
     
    (emphasis added in previous quote) And there's one of the reasons people are asking for change.  Some of us don't want ham-fisted stories or commentary.  If you have commentary to make, do it right.  Don't fall back on lazy tropes or stereotypes for plots and characters.
  8. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Troels Pleimert in Political correctness and feminism   
    Apologies in advance if my post comes off like I'm firing from both barrels without warning.  Because this has been irking me all day and I wanted to chime in.
    Yup.  The article Fronzel linked points that out later on: "The sexual violence at the end of that tutorial will single out a fifth of the female audience who have experienced sexual violence".  There's also this October 2013 report from the World Health Organization which shows that number jumps up to 35% on a worldwide scale for general sexual violence.
     
    Look Fronzel, this isn't some sort of moral panic like the ones you're equating it to.  No one is saying people need to stop making these games because bad things will happen if they don't.  People want the industry to shift away from a very entrenched worldview.  This isn't a hobby that is the domain of only adolescent white males these days.  There are other people playing games, and they are all minorities who are very underrepresented by the medium.  You say "It's 100% pure escapism".  How is it escapism for women if the majority of the time they're forced to play as a male character?  How is it escapism for a person of color when the vast majority of game characters are white?  Or LGBTQ players who want to have a non-heterosexual relationship option in a game but the developers didn't think to include one?
     
    This isn't the gestapo coming by and saying we need to burn these games.  This is criticism.  This is a reviewer doing her job and saying that she had a very negative reaction to a specific scene in a game that she didn't think was handled properly by the developers.  This is a reviewer who clearly enjoyed the previous game and is pointing out to the developer and the community that she thinks a specific scene weakens the product and will likely negatively impact other players too.  Criticism allows people to have a dialogue about issues.  Censorship does not.  Shouting down people who bring up valid points is not how you have a dialogue such as this follow-up interview with Dennaton on RPS.  What Cara's doing is no different than someone pointing out they didn't think the voice acting was good on a specific character, or something in the story doesn't make sense.  She's not doing it because she hates the game, she's doing it because she wants this to be a good experience for anyone who plays it.  People don't get better at making things unless people are willing to explain the faults in their work.  And considering rape isn't usually handled well in a lot of fiction, it's a good criticism to levy because it can encourage the authors to revisit their work and see if they can handle it better or use a different scene to convey the same information (see the above interview).
     
    She's also doing other people a favor by highlighting content that might be problematic for them.  With 1 out of every 5 women having suffered from rape (and the real statistic is probably higher because it's an underreported crime for various reasons) there's real reason to let victims who might not be aware of the content in the game (especially considering the previous game didn't have any sexual violence in it).  Rape victims often suffer from something akin to PTSD like soldiers (and this is true of other abuse victims as well) and stuff like this can cause a very physical response for them.  That's being an empathic human being and looking out for others.
     
    No one is saying you can't enjoy these things.  I enjoyed the Larry games because I found them funny, but I also acknowledge there's some problematic bits in them as well (and a lot of this is due to the age in which the games were made).  I also like Game of Thrones which is also problematic in spots.  Does people pointing out the problematic bits diminsh my enjoyment of them?  Not really, but I also don't think people shouldn't voice their opinions and criticisms when there's something problematic going on.
     
    As for why it seems like this is all you see about games these days... Well it's a combination of factors.  The main one is that there's a lot more gamers out there from all walks of life and it's no longer the 80's or 90's where many of the minorities were unwilling to speak up.  The Internet has given a lot of groups their own safe spaces to gather and discuss issues without fear of retaliation.  Some of these people are now writing for game publications, running their own sites, or just being vocal on social media.  So a lot of opinions that were being kept underground before are now out in the open and finding there's an audience of likeminded people.  There's also the fact that a lot of people are dissastisfied with the current stagnation in the market and encouraging developers to write for different demographics is one way of addressing this.  And some people are growing older and looking around and noticing that "hey, there's very few games with good female characters for my daughter to look up to".  (Great post here by Jeff Vogel of Spiderweb Software if anyone's interested)
     
    I'm 31 and have been gaming since I was 5.  I know I'd much rather live in a world where more people feel empowered by games because they can find characters to relate to other than buff macho white guy with a gun.  I love games and I want more people to enjoy them.  I also want to live in a world where hopefully my offspring will be able to enjoy a large variety of games regardless of their gender (or sexual orientation, or religious beliefs, or ethnicity, etc.).
     
    So I ask you, Fronzel, what the fuck gives you the right to air question another person's opinion in such a callous manner?
  9. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from drdrslashvohaul in Political correctness and feminism   
    Apologies in advance if my post comes off like I'm firing from both barrels without warning.  Because this has been irking me all day and I wanted to chime in.
    Yup.  The article Fronzel linked points that out later on: "The sexual violence at the end of that tutorial will single out a fifth of the female audience who have experienced sexual violence".  There's also this October 2013 report from the World Health Organization which shows that number jumps up to 35% on a worldwide scale for general sexual violence.
     
    Look Fronzel, this isn't some sort of moral panic like the ones you're equating it to.  No one is saying people need to stop making these games because bad things will happen if they don't.  People want the industry to shift away from a very entrenched worldview.  This isn't a hobby that is the domain of only adolescent white males these days.  There are other people playing games, and they are all minorities who are very underrepresented by the medium.  You say "It's 100% pure escapism".  How is it escapism for women if the majority of the time they're forced to play as a male character?  How is it escapism for a person of color when the vast majority of game characters are white?  Or LGBTQ players who want to have a non-heterosexual relationship option in a game but the developers didn't think to include one?
     
    This isn't the gestapo coming by and saying we need to burn these games.  This is criticism.  This is a reviewer doing her job and saying that she had a very negative reaction to a specific scene in a game that she didn't think was handled properly by the developers.  This is a reviewer who clearly enjoyed the previous game and is pointing out to the developer and the community that she thinks a specific scene weakens the product and will likely negatively impact other players too.  Criticism allows people to have a dialogue about issues.  Censorship does not.  Shouting down people who bring up valid points is not how you have a dialogue such as this follow-up interview with Dennaton on RPS.  What Cara's doing is no different than someone pointing out they didn't think the voice acting was good on a specific character, or something in the story doesn't make sense.  She's not doing it because she hates the game, she's doing it because she wants this to be a good experience for anyone who plays it.  People don't get better at making things unless people are willing to explain the faults in their work.  And considering rape isn't usually handled well in a lot of fiction, it's a good criticism to levy because it can encourage the authors to revisit their work and see if they can handle it better or use a different scene to convey the same information (see the above interview).
     
    She's also doing other people a favor by highlighting content that might be problematic for them.  With 1 out of every 5 women having suffered from rape (and the real statistic is probably higher because it's an underreported crime for various reasons) there's real reason to let victims who might not be aware of the content in the game (especially considering the previous game didn't have any sexual violence in it).  Rape victims often suffer from something akin to PTSD like soldiers (and this is true of other abuse victims as well) and stuff like this can cause a very physical response for them.  That's being an empathic human being and looking out for others.
     
    No one is saying you can't enjoy these things.  I enjoyed the Larry games because I found them funny, but I also acknowledge there's some problematic bits in them as well (and a lot of this is due to the age in which the games were made).  I also like Game of Thrones which is also problematic in spots.  Does people pointing out the problematic bits diminsh my enjoyment of them?  Not really, but I also don't think people shouldn't voice their opinions and criticisms when there's something problematic going on.
     
    As for why it seems like this is all you see about games these days... Well it's a combination of factors.  The main one is that there's a lot more gamers out there from all walks of life and it's no longer the 80's or 90's where many of the minorities were unwilling to speak up.  The Internet has given a lot of groups their own safe spaces to gather and discuss issues without fear of retaliation.  Some of these people are now writing for game publications, running their own sites, or just being vocal on social media.  So a lot of opinions that were being kept underground before are now out in the open and finding there's an audience of likeminded people.  There's also the fact that a lot of people are dissastisfied with the current stagnation in the market and encouraging developers to write for different demographics is one way of addressing this.  And some people are growing older and looking around and noticing that "hey, there's very few games with good female characters for my daughter to look up to".  (Great post here by Jeff Vogel of Spiderweb Software if anyone's interested)
     
    I'm 31 and have been gaming since I was 5.  I know I'd much rather live in a world where more people feel empowered by games because they can find characters to relate to other than buff macho white guy with a gun.  I love games and I want more people to enjoy them.  I also want to live in a world where hopefully my offspring will be able to enjoy a large variety of games regardless of their gender (or sexual orientation, or religious beliefs, or ethnicity, etc.).
     
    So I ask you, Fronzel, what the fuck gives you the right to air question another person's opinion in such a callous manner?
  10. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Frede in Political correctness and feminism   
    Apologies in advance if my post comes off like I'm firing from both barrels without warning.  Because this has been irking me all day and I wanted to chime in.
    Yup.  The article Fronzel linked points that out later on: "The sexual violence at the end of that tutorial will single out a fifth of the female audience who have experienced sexual violence".  There's also this October 2013 report from the World Health Organization which shows that number jumps up to 35% on a worldwide scale for general sexual violence.
     
    Look Fronzel, this isn't some sort of moral panic like the ones you're equating it to.  No one is saying people need to stop making these games because bad things will happen if they don't.  People want the industry to shift away from a very entrenched worldview.  This isn't a hobby that is the domain of only adolescent white males these days.  There are other people playing games, and they are all minorities who are very underrepresented by the medium.  You say "It's 100% pure escapism".  How is it escapism for women if the majority of the time they're forced to play as a male character?  How is it escapism for a person of color when the vast majority of game characters are white?  Or LGBTQ players who want to have a non-heterosexual relationship option in a game but the developers didn't think to include one?
     
    This isn't the gestapo coming by and saying we need to burn these games.  This is criticism.  This is a reviewer doing her job and saying that she had a very negative reaction to a specific scene in a game that she didn't think was handled properly by the developers.  This is a reviewer who clearly enjoyed the previous game and is pointing out to the developer and the community that she thinks a specific scene weakens the product and will likely negatively impact other players too.  Criticism allows people to have a dialogue about issues.  Censorship does not.  Shouting down people who bring up valid points is not how you have a dialogue such as this follow-up interview with Dennaton on RPS.  What Cara's doing is no different than someone pointing out they didn't think the voice acting was good on a specific character, or something in the story doesn't make sense.  She's not doing it because she hates the game, she's doing it because she wants this to be a good experience for anyone who plays it.  People don't get better at making things unless people are willing to explain the faults in their work.  And considering rape isn't usually handled well in a lot of fiction, it's a good criticism to levy because it can encourage the authors to revisit their work and see if they can handle it better or use a different scene to convey the same information (see the above interview).
     
    She's also doing other people a favor by highlighting content that might be problematic for them.  With 1 out of every 5 women having suffered from rape (and the real statistic is probably higher because it's an underreported crime for various reasons) there's real reason to let victims who might not be aware of the content in the game (especially considering the previous game didn't have any sexual violence in it).  Rape victims often suffer from something akin to PTSD like soldiers (and this is true of other abuse victims as well) and stuff like this can cause a very physical response for them.  That's being an empathic human being and looking out for others.
     
    No one is saying you can't enjoy these things.  I enjoyed the Larry games because I found them funny, but I also acknowledge there's some problematic bits in them as well (and a lot of this is due to the age in which the games were made).  I also like Game of Thrones which is also problematic in spots.  Does people pointing out the problematic bits diminsh my enjoyment of them?  Not really, but I also don't think people shouldn't voice their opinions and criticisms when there's something problematic going on.
     
    As for why it seems like this is all you see about games these days... Well it's a combination of factors.  The main one is that there's a lot more gamers out there from all walks of life and it's no longer the 80's or 90's where many of the minorities were unwilling to speak up.  The Internet has given a lot of groups their own safe spaces to gather and discuss issues without fear of retaliation.  Some of these people are now writing for game publications, running their own sites, or just being vocal on social media.  So a lot of opinions that were being kept underground before are now out in the open and finding there's an audience of likeminded people.  There's also the fact that a lot of people are dissastisfied with the current stagnation in the market and encouraging developers to write for different demographics is one way of addressing this.  And some people are growing older and looking around and noticing that "hey, there's very few games with good female characters for my daughter to look up to".  (Great post here by Jeff Vogel of Spiderweb Software if anyone's interested)
     
    I'm 31 and have been gaming since I was 5.  I know I'd much rather live in a world where more people feel empowered by games because they can find characters to relate to other than buff macho white guy with a gun.  I love games and I want more people to enjoy them.  I also want to live in a world where hopefully my offspring will be able to enjoy a large variety of games regardless of their gender (or sexual orientation, or religious beliefs, or ethnicity, etc.).
     
    So I ask you, Fronzel, what the fuck gives you the right to air question another person's opinion in such a callous manner?
  11. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Frede in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    Al's got a tip jar on his website. Maybe use that? I don't think calling for an organized boycott helps the situation at all, but giving people a heads up on the antics isn't a bad idea.
     

    I am!
  12. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Frede in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    Larry 2 is probably one of the few games in the franchise that really could use a remake (5 is probably the other). I'll be sad if we don't get that one, but unfortunately it's a much bigger game and they already had to dump additional money into Reloaded just to have enough cash to finish it. Reloaded came out ok, but there's some very rough edges which was to be expected given the resources they had.
     
    Anyways, I decided to send Al an email inquiry this morning just to say I still support him and any future endeavors despite whatever is going on at Replay. I figured given everyone's anger at he who shall not be named and the company it seemed like a good idea to let Al know that some people still believe in him and his creation. I know Larry means a lot to him and I've always hoped that HWSNBN wasn't trying to take advantage of Al for personal gain.
     
    I wonder if the Coles, Jane Jensen, and Jim Walls felt there was something fishy about Replay? None of them signed on with Replay for their projects and oddly it doesn't sound like HWSHNBN ever gave much consideration to QfG, GK, or PQ in some of the earlier interviews. It was all about KQ, SQ, and LSL which I think were Sierra's best selling adventure series in the heyday?
  13. Like
    shoptroll reacted to Blackthorne in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    This is also something to keep in mind; nobody will ever remake an entire game (or create an entire fan-game) that was created by Paul Trowe. No one, out of pure love and admiration, will dedicate so much time and effort into such a thing. Something for which no compensation was required; just the sheer joy of doing it and sharing it with others.
     
    He'll never have that. He can flap his mouth now, and boast about any successes, financial gook, whatever - but he'll never, ever, ever have that admiration and love. Ever. You can't buy that, you can't swindle that, and you can't fake your way to that.
     
    He can claim to want to be "Sierra 2.0" but it'll never happen; he doesn't have the charisma to pull it off. Sure, Sierra was a business, we all know that. And inherent in that are lots of things that can be at conflict with the passions of the heart - but when that fades, and we're here - 20+ years later, still loving these games that made their financial "nut" a long time ago, and yet the love, dedication and devotion remains.
     
    We'll still remember and love Scott Murphy and Mark Crowe long after we've all forgotten the name Paul Trowe. In the end, that will be his legacy. Nothing. There will be no legacy. That is kind of sad, if you can think about it from an outside perspective. But we all chose our own paths and we reap what we sow. You can shuffle off this mortal coil so easily - you have to ask yourself "What is it, really, that you want to leave behind? What kind of impression can I make on my fellow man?" I often asked myself this when I was on dialysis, as it seemed like I could be gone any second, and though I've not always been perfect - I have tried my best not to cast a shadow of darkness (Hah!).
     
    I don't care what Paul Trowe has done with Leisure Suit Larry; it's honestly irrelevant to SpaceVenture. I don't know if it was really a "success", I don't know how it did financially. If people enjoyed the production of it, and got the joy of making a game, at least it could be a success on that level. However, I don't know if it was a great process making it. Whatever the case, I know there were lots of decent people who did work on that game - and worked hard.
     
    But, again, their "sucess" or lack of it has nothing to do with SpaceVenture. SpaceVenture is its own project - and it has it's own needs, its own timeline and its own challenges. Maybe Paul is jealous that they didn't join "Sierra 2.0" but now it's obvious that he was never the right person for that job.
     
    So, my friends and colleagues, I don't damn Paul Trowe or Replay Games; the noose of his hanging was fashioned by his own hands, and I don't want to take any joy in someone's bad/self-destructive behavior. I do, however, celebrate The Two Guys From Andromeda (And one Space Pope!) who have become friends and brothers-in-arms over the past few years, and continue my support of them, and I know they'll make a great game, full of adventure, fun, laughs and maybe even a gruesome death or two!!
     
     
    Bt
  14. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from tomimt in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    I saw this on UMBCast's Twitter feed and wanted to chime in as a show of support for Serena, et. al. You all made the right choice to stand up to Paul who was acting like a bully.
     
    While I think Paul's entitled to his opinion, the way he's acted since that post has been pretty shameful. To quote a certain movie, "You're not wrong Walter, you're just an asshole".
     
    I don't know anything about the office politics around Sierra back in the day, but I have a really hard time believing that Ken Williams would let this level of animosity erupt between project teams. And, most importantly, he certainly wouldn't go about pissing off the company's most loyal fans in such a manner, based on what he's said on SierraGamers.
     
    Paul seriously needs to get over the fact that Replay isn't Sierra 2.0 and that Larry Reloaded and Fester Mudd aren't selling as well as they hoped. I'm also dismayed that Josh supposedly left. I was looking forward to seeing a Larry 2 remake (which it could tremendously benefit from) but between Paul's behavior and Al's co-writer/Replay's Chief Creative Officer likely gone what enthusiasm I had left for that possible project is gone. Al and Larry deserve better than that.
     
    I'm sure SpaceVenture is going to turn out fine despite what Paul thinks. Yes, the communication hasn't been the greatest, but I think the team will get eventually something out the door even if they have to scale the project back some. I'm patient and I know they're not working with an established development team (like N-Fusion) so there's going to be some turbulence in the process.
     
    Anyways, that's my 2 cents.... er buckazoids?
  15. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Frede in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    I saw this on UMBCast's Twitter feed and wanted to chime in as a show of support for Serena, et. al. You all made the right choice to stand up to Paul who was acting like a bully.
     
    While I think Paul's entitled to his opinion, the way he's acted since that post has been pretty shameful. To quote a certain movie, "You're not wrong Walter, you're just an asshole".
     
    I don't know anything about the office politics around Sierra back in the day, but I have a really hard time believing that Ken Williams would let this level of animosity erupt between project teams. And, most importantly, he certainly wouldn't go about pissing off the company's most loyal fans in such a manner, based on what he's said on SierraGamers.
     
    Paul seriously needs to get over the fact that Replay isn't Sierra 2.0 and that Larry Reloaded and Fester Mudd aren't selling as well as they hoped. I'm also dismayed that Josh supposedly left. I was looking forward to seeing a Larry 2 remake (which it could tremendously benefit from) but between Paul's behavior and Al's co-writer/Replay's Chief Creative Officer likely gone what enthusiasm I had left for that possible project is gone. Al and Larry deserve better than that.
     
    I'm sure SpaceVenture is going to turn out fine despite what Paul thinks. Yes, the communication hasn't been the greatest, but I think the team will get eventually something out the door even if they have to scale the project back some. I'm patient and I know they're not working with an established development team (like N-Fusion) so there's going to be some turbulence in the process.
     
    Anyways, that's my 2 cents.... er buckazoids?
  16. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from flesk in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    I saw this on UMBCast's Twitter feed and wanted to chime in as a show of support for Serena, et. al. You all made the right choice to stand up to Paul who was acting like a bully.
     
    While I think Paul's entitled to his opinion, the way he's acted since that post has been pretty shameful. To quote a certain movie, "You're not wrong Walter, you're just an asshole".
     
    I don't know anything about the office politics around Sierra back in the day, but I have a really hard time believing that Ken Williams would let this level of animosity erupt between project teams. And, most importantly, he certainly wouldn't go about pissing off the company's most loyal fans in such a manner, based on what he's said on SierraGamers.
     
    Paul seriously needs to get over the fact that Replay isn't Sierra 2.0 and that Larry Reloaded and Fester Mudd aren't selling as well as they hoped. I'm also dismayed that Josh supposedly left. I was looking forward to seeing a Larry 2 remake (which it could tremendously benefit from) but between Paul's behavior and Al's co-writer/Replay's Chief Creative Officer likely gone what enthusiasm I had left for that possible project is gone. Al and Larry deserve better than that.
     
    I'm sure SpaceVenture is going to turn out fine despite what Paul thinks. Yes, the communication hasn't been the greatest, but I think the team will get eventually something out the door even if they have to scale the project back some. I'm patient and I know they're not working with an established development team (like N-Fusion) so there's going to be some turbulence in the process.
     
    Anyways, that's my 2 cents.... er buckazoids?
  17. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from Intendant S in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    I saw this on UMBCast's Twitter feed and wanted to chime in as a show of support for Serena, et. al. You all made the right choice to stand up to Paul who was acting like a bully.
     
    While I think Paul's entitled to his opinion, the way he's acted since that post has been pretty shameful. To quote a certain movie, "You're not wrong Walter, you're just an asshole".
     
    I don't know anything about the office politics around Sierra back in the day, but I have a really hard time believing that Ken Williams would let this level of animosity erupt between project teams. And, most importantly, he certainly wouldn't go about pissing off the company's most loyal fans in such a manner, based on what he's said on SierraGamers.
     
    Paul seriously needs to get over the fact that Replay isn't Sierra 2.0 and that Larry Reloaded and Fester Mudd aren't selling as well as they hoped. I'm also dismayed that Josh supposedly left. I was looking forward to seeing a Larry 2 remake (which it could tremendously benefit from) but between Paul's behavior and Al's co-writer/Replay's Chief Creative Officer likely gone what enthusiasm I had left for that possible project is gone. Al and Larry deserve better than that.
     
    I'm sure SpaceVenture is going to turn out fine despite what Paul thinks. Yes, the communication hasn't been the greatest, but I think the team will get eventually something out the door even if they have to scale the project back some. I'm patient and I know they're not working with an established development team (like N-Fusion) so there's going to be some turbulence in the process.
     
    Anyways, that's my 2 cents.... er buckazoids?
  18. Like
    shoptroll got a reaction from MusicallyInspired in Paul Trowe criticism on Kickstarter update   
    I saw this on UMBCast's Twitter feed and wanted to chime in as a show of support for Serena, et. al. You all made the right choice to stand up to Paul who was acting like a bully.
     
    While I think Paul's entitled to his opinion, the way he's acted since that post has been pretty shameful. To quote a certain movie, "You're not wrong Walter, you're just an asshole".
     
    I don't know anything about the office politics around Sierra back in the day, but I have a really hard time believing that Ken Williams would let this level of animosity erupt between project teams. And, most importantly, he certainly wouldn't go about pissing off the company's most loyal fans in such a manner, based on what he's said on SierraGamers.
     
    Paul seriously needs to get over the fact that Replay isn't Sierra 2.0 and that Larry Reloaded and Fester Mudd aren't selling as well as they hoped. I'm also dismayed that Josh supposedly left. I was looking forward to seeing a Larry 2 remake (which it could tremendously benefit from) but between Paul's behavior and Al's co-writer/Replay's Chief Creative Officer likely gone what enthusiasm I had left for that possible project is gone. Al and Larry deserve better than that.
     
    I'm sure SpaceVenture is going to turn out fine despite what Paul thinks. Yes, the communication hasn't been the greatest, but I think the team will get eventually something out the door even if they have to scale the project back some. I'm patient and I know they're not working with an established development team (like N-Fusion) so there's going to be some turbulence in the process.
     
    Anyways, that's my 2 cents.... er buckazoids?
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